Media Consumption Patterns and Communicative Competence of University Students

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The concept of media competence arises in the last decade to describe audiovisual education levels of citizens, the interaction of individuals with complex media environments, and the effects of the screens and their influences on audiences. This
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    Página 1 de 2http://sistemas.udo.mx/glype148c/browse.php?u=gQYWvKN2IeBd…AF44BOXpsoId1JZbiCd1RnG6nVt0G%2F2oaC7oi145y6zvbaxLl8U&b=5 Search  Alerts AlertsMy listMy listMy ScopusMy Scopus ScopusSciValHelp  Export  |  Download  |  More... Top of page Global Media Journal, Canadian Edition Volume 7, Issue 2, 2014, Pages 23-39 Media consumption patterns and communicative competence of university students  (Article)  Abstract The concept of media competence arises in the last decade to describe audiovisual education levels of citizens, the interaction of individuals with complex media environments, and the effects of the screensand their influences on audiences. This paper analyzes media consumption patterns and perceptions of university students to certain stimuli emitted by the screens (Internet, social networks, and television),recreating an overview of the uses and acceptance that recipients give to the media content theybroadcast. In that sense, the results of this work allow to establish a relationship between screenconsumption patterns of university students and the media contents. This research was conducted in aMexican university. First, an exploratory questionnaire was applied to a stratified probabilistic sample,which helped to interpret how audience uses the new communication artifacts. Then, a secondstructured questionnaire was applied, to demonstrate the dynamism of current communicationprocesses in contemporary societies, where the role of media is fundamental for public life, society,culture, and even a major element in private life of the subjects.  Author keywords  Audience; Communication; Communicative competence; Media consumption; Media narrative; Mexico;Perceptions; University student ISSN: 19185901 Source Type: Journal Original language: English Document Type:  Article Publisher: Department of Communication, University of Ottawa © Copyright 2015 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved. Cited by 0 documents Inform me when this document is cited in Scopus: Set citation alert  |  Set citation feed Mendeley Readership Statistics Save to Mendeley  |  View this article in Mendeley   About Scopus What is ScopusContent coverage Language  Customer Service Help and ContactLive Chat About Elsevier Terms and Conditions  Register  Login   Página 1 de 2http://www.gmj.uottawa.ca/about-gmj--ce_e.html Global Media Journal -- Canadian Edition is a bilingual (English and French) open-access online academicrefereed publication that is hosted by the University of Ottawa and which is dedicated to research in thefields of communication and media studies. GMJ -- CE welcomes high-quality, srcinal submissions on awide range of related topics to communication and media studies that develop communication and mediatheories, report empirical and analytical research, present critical discourses, apply theories to casestudies, and set out innovative research methodologies. It aims to advance research and understandingof communication and media in Canada and around the globe.GMJ -- CE publishes two issues annually; one in the Spring (June) and one in the Fall (December). Eachissue focuses on a specific theme, and is divided into two sections: one for refereed papers, and anotherfor book reviews.Editor of GMJ -- CE receives proposals from communication and media studies established scholars to beguest editors for each issue. The journal welcomes themes that explore the broad boundaries of communication and media studies, including, but not limited to: print media, broadcasting, radio,advertising, public relations, information and communication technologies, emerging media, alternativemedia, political communication, political economy of communication, journalism, research methodology,rhetoric, cultural studies, media effects, media ethics, and communications law and policy. In consultationwith the Advisory Board, Editor selects proposed themes. Guided by the themed issues’ call for papers,authors submit papers to the guest editors who manage the refereeing and editing processes accordingto the guidelines provided by the Editor of GMJ -- CE.Contributing authors retain copyright on their work, but give permission to GMJ -- CE to reprint theirpublished articles in other electronic and print formats, including books. Views expressed in GMJ -- CE are not necessarily endorsed by the Editor, Advisory Board, or theUniversity of Ottawa.GMJ -- CE is listed, abstracted, and indexed in Cabell's , DOAJ , EBSCO , LAC , ProQuest , SciVerseScopus , SPD , and Ulrich's .  Top ^^ ISSN:1918-5901 (English) -- 1918-591X (Français)   About GMJ -- CE   Home   |   About GMJ -- CE | Editor |   Advisory Board   |   Current Issue | Future Issues   |   Back Issues |Submission Guidelines | Media Links |   Contact Us   |   Search   About GMJ -- CEEditorAdvisory BoardCurrent IssueFuture IssuesBack IssuesGuidelinesMedia LinksContact Us   , oa ea ourna -- anaan on ISSN: 1918-5901 (English) -- ISSN: 1918-591X (Français) oume , ssue , pp. - Media Consumption Patterns and Communicative Competence of University Students  Abel A. Grijalva Verdugo Universidad de Occidente, Mexico  Rosario Olivia Izaguirre Fierro Universidad Autónoma de Sinaloa, Mexico  Abstract:   The concept of media competence arises in the last decade to describe audiovisual education levels of citizens, the interaction of individuals with complex media environments, and the effects of the screens and their influences on audiences. This paper analyzes media consumption patterns and perceptions of university students to certain stimuli emitted by the screens (Internet, social networks, and television), recreating an overview of the uses and acceptance that recipients give to the media content they broadcast. In that sense, the results of this work allow to establish a relationship between screen consumption patterns of university students and the media contents. This research was conducted in a Mexican university. First, an exploratory questionnaire was applied to a stratified  probabilistic sample, which helped to interpret how audience uses the new communication artifacts. Then, a second structured questionnaire was applied, to demonstrate the dynamism of current communication processes in contemporary societies, where the role of media is fundamental for public life, society, culture, and even a major element in private life of the subjects.  Keywords: Audience; Communication; Communicative Competence; Media Consumption; Media Narrative; Mexico; Perceptions; University Student  e . rava erugo an  osaro va zagurre erro  Résumé: La question du concept de la compétence des médias se pose depuis les dernières décennies pour décrire le niveau de l'éducation audiovisuelle des citoyens, l'interaction des individus avec l'environnement complexe des médias et les effets des écrans et leurs influences sur les audiences. Cet article analyse les standards de consommation des médias et les perceptions des universitaires face à certains stimuli émis par les écrans (Internet, réseaux sociaux et télévision). Recréant ainsi une vue d'ensemble de l'utilisation et de la réception que les bénéficiaires donnent au contenu des médias qu'ils programment. En ce sens, les résultats de ce travail  permettent d'établir une relation entre les standards de la consommation de l'écran des universitaires et le contenu des médias. Cette recherche menée par une université mexicaine élabore premièrement, un questionnaire exploratoire appliqué à un échantillon probabiliste stratifié, lequel aide à interpréter comment le public utilise les nouveaux objets de communication. Par la suite, un deuxième questionnaire structuré a été adressé, pour démontrer le dynamisme des processus courants de communication dans nos sociétés contemporaines, où le rôle des médias est fondamental pour la vie publique, la société, la culture, et est, de plus, un élément majeur dans la vie privée des sujets.  Mots-clés:   Audience; Communication; Compétence communicative; Consommation des médias; Étudiant universitaire; Mexique; Narratif des médias; Perceptions  Introduction: Screens, Consumption, and Communication Competence 1   Hypermodern society, invaded by images in grotesque labyrinths of sound, luxury, consumption, and trends imposed by media, is characterized by a proliferation of digital, urban, technological, and consumerist phenomena, with which learns to see, but is also blinded by; its sails in the  perfect illusion of the visual seas, almost psychedelic, generated by screens, globalization, and the use of technologies. Per se, the screen is precisely a new line of coexistence between the new media discourses. To Ferres Prats, “the current profusion of images and sounds is causing the birth of a new kind of intelligence. The new man, with a predominance of the right hemisphere, understands mainly in a sensitive way, letting all his senses vibrate” (1994: 26). The term screens, has emerged from the study of media narratives, which operating ways are the digital screens: cell phones, PCs, laptops, cinema, television, tablets, smart devices based on informatics systems, and Internet connection. However, the study of these new communication devices comes from the interest in understanding the rapid rise of media and their interaction with audiences. Different communication theories have tried to understand such phenomena; from the effects they make in society to the role society assumes to modify the visual narratives. In that sense, Gutierrez, Valero, and Pereira (2006) state that only when the individual becomes aware of the emotions  ea onsumpon aerns an ommuncave ompeence o nversy uens experimented through screens, he or she will be able to capture the true message such emotions  propose. The message is invaluable when communication becomes experience, and the spectator reflects his reality, interests, and desires, to the recognition of his world in the media narratives. From this perspective, there are two research objectives: to know the media consumption guidelines of a population section in order to establish relationships between preferred television formats or social media—being this last one the most used—and the objectives made in each medium to generate reflections and critics, among other qualities. The hypothesis is that new media—computers, cell phones, etc.—are modifying the communication scene of 21 st  century. The old media are facing problems that not only matter to them, but that generate evolutionary waves in the whole system, helping maintain social media up to date, and make dependencies of information between the individuals. Such evolution is present in human links made through Internet. The audience has a starring role in messages production and construction of meanings, as Carballar (2012) mentions. Social media are online platforms where the content is made by the users, allowing them to interact with others in a simple, easy, and even entertaining way. According to the same author, the average Facebook user has around 130 friends, spends more than 55 minutes a day on it, accessing its content through mobile devices, and is a member of 12 groups of interest. This  provides a problem line about the use complexity of new media and their possible repercussions in political, cultural, and social spheres. But, what is media competence? It is a derivation of the concept screens that arises in the last decade to determine the citizens’ levels of audio-visual education and the subjects’ interaction with complex media environments, as well as the effects screens are generating in new consumers, all from a complex vision, where the new EMIRECs (transmitter, receiver, and transmitter producer) emerge. This concept indicates the communication dynamism to overcome the traditional banking model 2 . The EMIRECs have certain qualities that translate into a new way to see the communication process, in which audiences assume not only reception but also messages production. According to Aparici (2007), the receiver stops being a spectator to become a producer, or a message transmitter. The EMIRECs model is based on a horizontal and democratic communication approach, as it happens in everyday life. In a real communicative relationship, there are continuous interactions between receivers and transmitters, interchanging these roles dynamically. Study of the Screen Impact This paper rejects the hypothesis that screens have an automatic impact on audiences. Current users give meanings to messages actively, not in the basic model of passive recipients. Citizens have their own interpretations before receiving the messages. Pecheux (cited in Morley, 1996) called this phenomenon “interdiscourse” where subjects experienced a multiplicity of discourses, some of them relate to the others, harmonize, contradict each other, and/or depend on the individuals’ cognitive schemes to be rejected or accepted by audience. This research parts from the fact that media competence is contextual to subjects, it is marked by the historical moment in which the viewer stands before the TV, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, movies, or video games. Most of the messages received by society are through screens, generating perception and reception processes that are very different from those made generations ago.
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