Geographical context and its impacts on daily mobility practices of the elderly: Empirical findings from a Luxembourg case study

Please download to get full document.

View again

of 3
2 views
PDF
All materials on our website are shared by users. If you have any questions about copyright issues, please report us to resolve them. We are always happy to assist you.
Document Description
Common results from National Travel Surveys show that old age relates to decreasing daily mobility (distance traveled and/or number of daily trips). There are quite evident reasons to explain this pattern, such as retirement (involving fewer trips),
Document Share
Document Tags
Document Transcript
  Geographical context and its impacts on daily mobility practices of the elderly: Empirical findings from a Luxembourg case study Bernhard Köppen 1 , Philippe Gerber 1 , Olivier Klein 1 , Sylvain Klein 1 , Basile Chaix 2 , Yan Kestens 3 1  LISER (Luxembourg Institute of Socio-Economic Research), Esch/Alzette, Luxembourg 2  INSERM (Institut National de la santé et de la recherche médicale), Paris, France 3  CHUM (  Centre hospitalier de l’Université de Montréa l), Montréal, Canada bernhard.koeppen@liser.lu Keywords: ageing, urbanism, mobility, discrete choice models 1. Objectives  Common results from National Travel Surveys show that old age relates to decreasing daily mobility (distance traveled and/or number of daily trips). There are quite evident reasons to explain this pattern, such as retirement (involving fewer trips), but also health issues and the general well-being. As possible limitations to mobility finally depend on individual characteristics, travel behavior and trip intensity of this population group needs sophisticated approaches for explanation. In this paper, we go beyond the analysis of mobility practices and classical socio-demographic criteria by including indicators related to the (built) environment and testing their determining effects. To do so, we identify a set of objective built environment indicators, which have significant impact on the daily mobility of the elderly. These factual determinants are confronted with subjective perception and its effects on travel behavior. Furthermore, the three other key-determinants of mobility - journey characteristics, socio-psychological and demographic factors - are included into the analysis. Hence, as evidence on how objective characteristics of the built environment affect travel among the older population is limited, we go further by examining the individually perceived and the objective (measurable) indicators related to built environment and spatial qualities. 2. Data and Methodology Our analysis uses discrete choice models in order to explain the number of trips per day of elder people and/or the average distance of those trips. As an underlying schema, the so-called 5Ds are used: design, density, diversity, distance to transit and destination access.  An adapted innovative, unique and robust strategy for socio-spatial sampling has been developed,  which allows us to build segmentation approaches in order to differentiate mobility behavior of elderly in Luxembourg. All empirical findings result from the Luxembourg data collection as part of the international project ― Contrasting Urban Contexts in Healthy Ageing  ‖ . In detail, the study is based on a quantitative survey dealing with well-being, health and daily mobility (including an interactive mapping tool) amongst 500 persons aged 65 and older, and on their location (GPS) data including physical activity measuring (accelerometer), collected during 7 days. 3. Expected results First analysis on a sub-sample within selected urban forms (urban core, peripheral-suburban, close-suburban) tend to indicate that good infrastructure conditions and density facilitate walking and other out-of-home activities; particularly for those without access to motorized private transport. On the other hand it is known, that living in a high-density neighborhood can affect the perceived safety and general well-being in a negative way. Older people feel less secure in high-density areas. Examining the 5-Dimensions with the CURHA database allows to further improve the findings of discrete choice models in this respect.  Proposal with references and bibliography Geographical context and its impacts on daily mobility practices of the elderly: Empirical findings from a Luxembourg case study Bernhard Köppen 1 , Philippe Gerber 1 , Olivier Klein 1 , Sylvain Klein 1 , Basile Chaix 2 , Yan Kestens 3 1  LISER (Luxembourg Institute of Socio-Economic Research), Esch/Alzette, Luxembourg 2  INSERM (Institut National de la santé et de la recherche médicale), Paris, France 3  CHUM (  Centre hospitalier de l’Université de Montréa l), Montréal, Canada bernhard.koeppen@liser.lu Keywords: ageing, urbanism, mobility, discrete choice models 1. Objectives  Common results from National Travel Surveys show that old age relates to decreasing daily mobility (distance traveled and/or number of daily trips). There are quite evident reasons to explain this pattern, such as retirement (involving fewer trips), but also health issues and the general well-being. As possible limitations to mobility finally depend on individual characteristics (Banister, Bowling 2004, Farquhar 1995), travel behavior and trip intensity of this population group (e.g. Alsnih, Hensher 2003; Siren, Hakamies-Blomqvist 2004) needs sophisticated approaches for explanation. In this paper, we go beyond the analysis of mobility practices and classical socio-demographic criteria by including indicators related to the (built) environment and testing their determining effects. To do so, we identify a set of objective built environment indicators, which have significant impact on the daily mobility of the elderly. These factual determinants are confronted with subjective perception and its effects on travel behavior. Furthermore, the three other key-determinants of mobility - journey characteristics, socio-psychological and demographic factors (Van Acker et al.  2010; De Witte et al. 2013, Schwanen, Lucas 2011)  –   are included into the analysis. Hence, as evidence on how objective characteristics of the built environment affect travel among the older population is limited (Figueroa et al. 2014), we go further by examining the individually perceived and the objective (measurable) indicators related to built environment and spatial qualities. 2. Data and Methodology Our analysis uses discrete choice models in order to explain the number of trips per day of elder people and/or the average distance of those trips (Train, 2009). As an underlying schema, the so-called 5Ds (Ewing, Cervero 2010) are used: design, density, diversity, distance to transit and destination access.  An adapted innovative, unique and robust strategy for socio-spatial sampling has been developed,  which allows us to build segmentation approaches in order to differentiate mobility behavior of elderly in Luxembourg (Haustein 2011). All empirical findings result from the Luxembourg data collection as part of the international project ― Contrasting Urban Contexts in Healthy Ageing  ‖ . In detail, the study is based on a quantitative survey dealing with well-being, health and daily mobility (including an interactive mapping tool) amongst 500 persons aged 65 and older, and on their location (GPS) data including physical activity measuring (accelerometer), collected during 7 days. 3. Expected results First analysis on a sub-sample within selected urban forms (urban core, peripheral-suburban, close-suburban) tend to indicate that good infrastructure conditions and density facilitate walking and other out-of-home activities; particularly for those without access to motorized private transport (see also Li et al. 2005). On the other hand it is known, that living in a high-density neighborhood can affect the perceived safety and general well-being in a negative way. Older people feel less secure in high-density  areas (see also Mollenkopf et al. 2004). Examining the 5-Dimensions with the CURHA database allows to further improve the findings of discrete choice models in this respect. Bibliography  Alsnih R. Hensher D.A. (2003) The mobility and accessibility expectations of seniors in an aging population. Transp. Res. Part A 37, 903  –  916. Banister D. Bowling A. (2004) Quality of life for the elderly: the transport dimension. Transport Policy 11, 105  –  115. De Witte A. Hollevoet J. Dobruszkes F. Hubert M. (2013) Linking modal choice to motility: a comprehensive review, Transportation Research Part A 49, 329-341. Ewing R. Cervero R. (2010) Travel and the built environment  —  a meta-analysis. Journal of  American Planning Association 76(3), 265  –  294. Farquhar M. (1995) Elderly people’s definitions of quality of life. Social Science and Medicine 41, 1439  –  1446. Figueroa M.J. Sick Nielsen T.A. Siren A. (2014) Comparing urban form correlations of the travel patterns of older and younger adults, Transport Policy, 35, 10-20. Haustein S. (2011) Mobility behavior of the elderly: an attitude-based segmentation approach for a heterogeneous target group. Transportation 39(6), 1079  –  1103. Li F. Fisher K. Brownson R. Bosworth M. (2005) Multilevel modelling of built Environment characteristics related to neighbourhood walking activity in older adults. Journal of Epidemiol. Community Health 59,558  –  564. Mollenkopf H. et al. (2004) Social and behavioural science perspectives on out-of-home mobility in later life: findings from The European Project MOBILATE. Eur.J.Ageing 1(1), 45  –  53. Schwanen T. Lucas K. (2011) Understanding auto motives. In K. Lucas, E. Blumenberg, R.  Weinberger (Eds.) Auto Motives: Understanding Car Use Behaviours, Emerald, 3-38. Siren A., Hakamies-Blomqvist L. (2004) Private car as the grand equaliser? Demographic factors in Finnish men and women aged 65?. Transp. Res. Part F 7, 107  –  118.  Train K. (2009) Discrete Choice Methods with Simulation. 2nd ed. Cambridge University Press.  Van Acker, V. Van Wee B. Witlox F. (2010) When Transport Geography Meets Social Psychology: Toward a Conceptual Model of Travel Behaviour. Transport Reviews, 30(2), 219-240.
Similar documents
View more...
Search Related
We Need Your Support
Thank you for visiting our website and your interest in our free products and services. We are nonprofit website to share and download documents. To the running of this website, we need your help to support us.

Thanks to everyone for your continued support.

No, Thanks